KLA/K-State Ranch Management Field Days coming up

The historic Black Diamond Angus Ranch, also known as Warner Angus Ranch, will host the first 2017 Kansas Livestock Association (KLA)/Kansas State University Ranch Management Field Day August 17 near Spearville. The ranch dates back to 1884 when Willis B. Warner moved to the Sawlog Creek Valley near the Ford-Hodgeman county line. Warner started a purebred Angus herd in 1893 and son John began a registered Morgan horse breeding program in 1949.

Today, the ranch is operated by Willis Warners great-granddaughter, Marcella Warner Holman, and her husband, John Holman. The Angus herd is the base of their commercial cow-calf operation and registered Morgan horses continue to be bred and used on the ranch.

Marcella Warner Holman will join K-State Extension Reproductive Physiologist Sandy Johnson on the field day program to discuss the impact of high-protein forages on fertility. Johnson has been collecting conception data and breeding success rates on Black Diamond heifers grazing triticale during the breeding season. The two will share results from the first year of the research project.

John Holman, a K-State agronomist, will give a presentation on how annual forage crops work with dryland farming. Holman has conducted research for more than 10 years on the viability and advisability of planting annual cover crops or forages in conjunction with conventional dryland cropping systems in western Kansas. This research includes the use of both multi- and single-species cover crops. Black Diamond has utilized triticale for supplemental grazing for the cow-calf herd and to provide a quality feed source during the late spring breeding season. Holman will discuss the economics and options available for annual forages in diversified livestock and farming operations.

The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) has assisted Black Diamond in developing new stockwater sources in strategic locations. NRCS District Conservationist Brad Shank will be on hand to describe what has been done on the ranch and highlight the assistance the agency can provide ranchers wanting to enhance stockwater systems and grassland health.

Oklahoma State University entomologist Justin Talley will discuss the latest on fly and tick control for beef cattle operations. Talley will explain the difference between face flies, horn flies, stable flies and deer flies. He also will provide timely research results on effective management practices that offer optimum control for these commonly found pests.

The August 17 field day will begin with registration at 3:30 p.m. and conclude with a free beef dinner at 6:45 p.m. All livestock producers and others involved in the business are invited to attend.

Black Diamond Angus Ranch is located south of Jetmore in Ford County. From Jetmore, go south on Highway 283 about 12 miles to A Road. At this intersection, go east on A Road for 2 miles, then mile south on 120 Road to the ranch headquarters. If coming from the Highway 283 and Highway 50 intersection near Wright, go north on Highway 283 for 9.2 miles to A Road. At this intersection, go east on A Road for 2 miles, then mile south on 120 Road to the ranch headquarters. Directional signs will be posted.

Mark Diederich and his family will host the second 2017 Kansas Livestock Association (KLA)/Kansas State University Ranch Management Field Day August 22 at their farm near Greenleaf. The Diederichs own and operate a diversified farming and cow-calf enterprise. They utilize timed artificial insemination (AI) in their breeding program, which is designed for a 60-day calving season. The Diederichs carefully select for traits that make economic sense and believe it is important to continually measure costs of production and financial returns.

In addition to a conventional cow-calf operation, the Diederichs have utilized a drylot and semi-confinement system for a portion of their herd since 2011. Mark will share his experiences with designing functional pens and feeding areas and preparing low-cost rations for cows and calves in the drylot. He also will highlight how he uses nearby fields for grazing summer annuals and adjacent pastures to shade cattle in the summer and provide protection during the early spring calving season. Attendees will have the chance to tour the facilities.

Also on the program will be Oklahoma State University entomologist Justin Talley. He will discuss the latest on fly and tick control for beef cattle operations and explain the difference between face flies, horn flies, stable flies and deer flies. He also will provide timely research results on effective management practices that offer optimum control for these commonly found pests.

With anaplasmosis becoming more prevalent in cowherds each year, it is important for ranchers to recognize the signs. K-State Extension Beef Veterinarian A.J. Tarpoff will be on hand to tell those in attendance how to identify and detect anaplasmosis infections. He also will provide management schemes that help control or minimize incidences of the disease in Kansas cowherds.

The August 22 field day will begin with registration at 3:30 p.m. and conclude with a free beef dinner at 6:45 p.m. All livestock producers and others involved in the business are invited to attend.

Diederich Family Farms is located south of Greenleaf in Washington County. From Manhattan, go north on Highway 77. Continue 2 miles past the Riley-Marshall County line to Cyclone Lane. From this intersection, go west 6 miles on Cyclone Lane, which becomes 2nd Road, to All American Road. Then go north 1 mile to 3rd Road. Go west 3 miles on 3rd Road to the field day site near the Xavier and 3rd Roads intersection. From Waterville, go south on Highway 77 about 7 miles to Cyclone Lane. From this intersection, go west 6 miles on Cyclone Lane/2nd Road to All American Road. Then go north 1 mile to 3rd Road. Go west 3 miles on 3rd Road to the field day site. Directional signs will be posted.

DL Cattle Company of Fredonia will host the final 2017 Kansas Livestock Association (KLA)/Kansas State University Ranch Management Field Day August 23. Joe and Helen Donohue and their son and daughter-in-law, Daryl and Jody, own the commercial cow-calf operation, which consists of both a spring- and fall-calving cowherd. The cattle are grazed year-round on native grass pastures in Wilson County using sustainable management practices.

A program highlight will be a presentation on controlling invasive species in native grasslands, including sericea lespedeza, with late-summer prescribed burning. As manager of the Woodson County Wildlife Area, John Johnson has conducted late summer prescribed burning and high-intensive, low-duration rotational grazing on 1,700 acres of the wildlife area. He will discuss his experiences with this project and the challenges ranchers and landowners face in controlling invasive plants in this region of southeast Kansas. K-State Range Beef Cattle Nutrition and Management Specialist KC Olson will join Johnson on
the program to share his findings on using late-season burning to control sericea lespedeza on a northern Flint Hills ranch.

Natural Resources Conservation Service Rangeland Management Specialist Garan Belt will be on hand to discuss a process developed by the agency to determine the forage production capabilities and appropriate stocking rate for a specific pasture. He will provide an example of how plant communities change among soil types and demonstrate how a grazing land manager can measure and monitor forage production.

Also on the agenda will be Oklahoma State University entomologist Justin Talley. He will discuss the latest on fly and tick control for beef cattle operations and explain the difference between face flies, horn flies, stable flies and deer flies. He also will provide timely research results on effective management practices that offer optimum control for these commonly found pests.

With anaplasmosis becoming more prevalent in cowherds each year, it is important for ranchers to
recognize the signs. K-State Extension Beef Veterinarian A.J. Tarpoff will be on hand to tell those in attendance how to identify and detect anaplasmosis infections. He also will provide management strategies that help control or minimize incidences of the disease in Kansas cowherds.

The August 23 field day will begin with registration at 3:30 p.m. and conclude with a free beef dinner at 6:45 p.m. Pre-registration is not required. All livestock producers and others involved in the business are invited to attend.

The location for the DL Cattle Company field day is a pasture north of Fredonia in northwestern
Wilson County. From the intersection of Highways 400/96/39, about 6 miles north of Fredonia, go 2 miles west on Highway 400/96 to Edwards Road. Then, go 1 miles north on Edwards Road to the
pasture entrance. Directional signs will be posted.

Bayer Animal Health and the Farm Credit Associations of Kansas are sponsoring all three events. For more information, go to www.kla.org or call the KLA office at (785) 273-5115.

Photo: AgView.net

Story source: KLA release

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